Skip to main content

Pawtucket and Greenville Stocked with Talent

Keith Law ranked the best rosters in minor league baseball and not surprising the Boston Red Sox have two minor league teams on the list.

The Pawtucket Red Sox and the Greenville Drive are loaded with future Red Sox stars and both made Keith Law's list of the most talented minor league teams this year. Here is what Keith Law had to say about both of them.

Pawtucket Red Sox (Triple-A)

Six of my top 10 Red Sox prospects from late January (before Yoan Moncada signed) will start the season with the Pawsox, including three of the team's five starters in Henry Owens, Eduardo Rodriguez and Matt Barnes, as well as their top overall prospect, catcher Blake Swihart. Fourth starter Brian Johnson is no slouch himself and might have the highest floor of any of their pitchers; he's a four-pitch guy with command who doesn't have a huge fastball or single dominant pitch. The Pawsox can play an all-prospect infield, with Garin Cecchini and Deven Marrero both potential average regulars, and Sean Coyle and Travis Shaw at least likely to get some big league time as emergency call-ups or bench players. The outfield has Jackie Bradley Jr., who has exhausted his rookie eligibility (meaning he's ineligible for my prospect lists) but whom I still project to end up someone's every-day centerfielder, as well as 27-year-old Cuban outfielder Rusney Castillo, too old for my rankings but technically a rookie and likely to spend most of this year in the Red Sox's outfield.

Greenville Drive (Class A)

The Drive will have a good problem in a few weeks once Cuban infielder Yoan Moncada arrives from extended spring training; they'll have him, third basemen Rafael Devers and Michael Chavis, and shortstop Javier Guerra all fighting for playing time at three infield spots. Moncada was a shortstop as well, but won't play there in the long term, likely moving to second or third base, but the logjam probably means we'll see all four players switch positions frequently and get some time at DH too. Outfielder Nick Longhi has real power potential from the right side, signing with the Red Sox for an over-slot bonus of $440,000 in the 30th round in 2013. The rotation has their second pick from last year, right-hander Michael Kopech; 2012 fourth-rounder Ty Buttrey, who received a first-round bonus but has yet to deliver on his promise; and lefty Williams Jerez, signed as an outfielder in 2011 but converted to the mound after 2013, showing immediate arm strength and surprising control out of the chute.



Buy OOTP Baseball 16 PC & Mac

Comments

Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

The Greatness of George Brett

One of my all time favorite non-Red Sox players is George Brett. He is in that class of guys like Chipper Jones, Willie Mays, and Pete Rose. Guys who never played for the Red Sox but I wish they had.

I have always liked Brett and I even got to see him play 6 games in Fenway Park in 1990 and 1991. I recently went down a George Brett rabbit hole on the internet and I was reminded why I really liked him as a player.

The first thing I loved about him is that he hated the Yankees and still hates the Yankees. The Royals and the Yankees had some battles during the 70s and 80s and Brett was right in the middle of it all.

Brett was also a Yankee Killer, especially in the playoffs. Brett played in 17 postseason games against the Yankees and had 24 hits, 6 homers and 14 RBI. Not bad.

Here he is going deep three times in Game 3 of the 1978 ALCS



We all know what a prick Goose Gossage has become, here is Brett turning on a Gossage fastball in 1980 and sending it into the third deck of Yankee S…

A Homer and a Suicide: The Life of a Gay Red Sox Outfielder?

Ted Williams homered in his last at bat off Jack Fisher of the Baltimore Orioles. Williams was supposedly the only player in the history of baseball to retire after sending one deep. The great John Thorn found that hard to believe and through research discovered others who homered in their final at-bat. You can read his piece on that right here. Ted Williams was not the only player to do it and he wasn't even the only Red Sox outfielder to do it. Chick Stahl did it first on October 6, 1906 off of Tom Hughes of the New York Highlanders (Yankees). It was Chick Stahl's 36th and final home-run of his very successful career. He was just 33 years old and had played in his final game. Nobody knew it at the time. Stahl hit .305 for his career, led the league in triples in 1904 and would be a key player in the Boston Americans (Red Sox) winning the 1903 World Series. A month after his last game Stahl would get married but in March of the next year he would kill himself by drinking carb…

Willie Mays Would Have Had It

"Willie would have had it." I heard it the first time I went to a baseball game and have heard it or thought about it at every game since. The words would come from my father as he tried to teach me about the greatness of Willie Mays. Fly balls that hit warning track or that would drop in front of or to the side of an outfielder would get the same comment from my Dad, "Willie would have had it".


My father grew up a Mays fan and was surrounded by Mickey Mantle fans. His neighborhood was just one of the many neighborhoods where fans of all ages debated over who was better. Mantle fans would talk about his ability to switch hit and when Mantle would struggle to match up with Willie they would argue it was only because of his bad knees. My father would respond accordingly, "fine, Mickey is the best centerfielder with bad knees and Willie is just the best centerfielder".

I was born in 1974, a year after Willie Mays played his final game. I never got to see hi…